​Transformation and Reconciliation in the Philippines

July 23 2018

Can God work in an environment of bitterness, discouragement, and broken relationships?

The Juan Project, a saturation project in the Philippines, seeks to multiply disciples, leaders, and churches. But, as the work expands, God brings healing and transformation to individuals, relationships, and communities as well. Here are some stories of this change.

Winnie, a pastor’s wife testified that she used to resist the ministry. She had strained relationships with the leaders of the church and other workers. Since she attended the Juan Project’s basic coaching training and got more involved in the additional trainings, her encounter with the Lord has changed her heart. She has started building relationships with the leaders of the church. Now, she has better working relationships with the leaders as they serve the Lord together.

Years ago, leaders chose to leave their denomination. Pain, hurt, and bitterness resulted. The present denominational leader involved in the split, humbled himself in a Juan Project training and apologized for past wrongs. A leader of those who had left the denomination also apologized. Reconciliation among former colleagues occurred. Today, they are working together on the same team for the saturation vision of the Juan Project among overseas foreign workers.

Pastors are also confessing how their relationship with their children has changed when they changed their approach. This was one of the results of coaching and of the work of God in their life.

As others see or hear of this transformation, reconciliation, and multiplication, the work expands into other provinces.

In preparation for the training in one of these provinces, the project manager for The Juan Project ran three ads on Facebook. On the first morning of the training, a pioneering church planter saw one of the ads when he opened Facebook. Immediately, he called and asked if it was too late to register for the training.

This pastor appeared at the training in the afternoon. He attended the rest of the training. As the training came toward the end, the pastor confided, “I was ready to give up and walk away from ministry. But, today, I am reborn. I have new tools to take back and use with my people.” A five-dollar investment in three Facebook ads led to the renewal of a discouraged pioneer church planter. He went home a new, energized worker.

God brings healing and reconciliation so that multiplication occurs.

Tags: philippines, the juan project, saturation ministry, transformation

Prison Metamorphosis

February 17 2016

Edgar Delgado grew up in a Christian home and attended church regularly with his family as a child in Colombia. But as he grew older, he made some bad decisions and chose to take the wrong path—a path that eventually led to his arrest and incarceration.

But God was not done with Edgar.

Through the incarceration process, Edgar reconnected with his childhood pastor, who was now a criminal defense lawyer. Edgar turned his life over to God.

While imprisoned, Edgar entered the prison training institute that Prison Fellowship of Antioquia operates in Bellavista prison. There, he found teachers who cared about him and listened to him. Over time, Edgar finished all three levels of the course, which focuses on personal growth, Old and New Testaments, and Christian ministry. His study of the Word enriched him. Through this study and his relationships with other Christian prisoners and volunteer staff members, Edgar learned the values of respect and love for everyone.

Edgar was released from prison two months ago and now works as a taxi driver. He attends church faithfully and preaches the Good News day and night as he drives his taxi. Those who hear him often ask him to pray for them. Edgar rejoices that he has the privilege of sharing Jesus.

The prison institutes, operated by OMS partner ministry Prison Fellowship Association of Antioquia, are helping bring dramatic transformation to the lives of prisoners and is equipping them to reach others both inside and outside of prison.

Tags: prison ministry, transformation, prison training institute, colombia,

Every Rock Tells a Story

January 5 2016

Moses struck a rock in the desert, and it produced lifesaving water. David put a rock in his sling and brought down a giant. Jesus declared to Peter that he would build his church upon the rock. God can do amazing things with rocks. A rock is steady, strong, a sure foundation.

We know that even now, our rocks surrendered to the hands of God can yield powerful results. In Hungary, our rocks form a 150-year-old building in Budapest’s 14th district. A virtual pile, stacked on top of each other, making up a refuge, a home, a place of training and equipping. A place of transformation.

As we engage in our vision to see Hungary transformed by Christ, our building will be a rock used to build the kingdom of God in Hungary. In their current state, our rocks need work. In addition to making up our walls, we need wiring, plaster, windows, flooring, internal walls, appliances, etc.

We invite you to join us over the next month for a journey of transformation. Many different people will share about how God is building his kingdom through the One Mission Society team and how the Transformational Ministry Center will play an important role in accomplishing his vision. Join us!

By Jonathan Long, OMS Hungary Field Leader

Tags: rocks, hungary, ministry center, transformation

Witch Doctor - Haiti

July 22 2015

While doing evangelism, we met a young lady, the daughter of a witch doctor. She heard our message and introduced us to her father who listened to the Gospel, but would not accept Christ.

A month later, this man went over the other side of the mountain to sell a cow. On his trip back home, he was attacked and beheaded. The police are not nearby, so his wife and children took his body and buried it.

Five days after his death, it was learned that his attackers had been paid to murder him. This realization precipitated a string of revenge killings in which three people lost their lives.

The road where the murder occurred is the route also used by the people of Augarde to access the school and market in town. Residents of the village below use the road to reach their farms on the hillsides and church in the mountains. As a result of the three revenge murders, three children were also killed on the route to school.

This on-going violence brought a halt to the regular rhythm of life, as people could not make their trips to school, market and church. Christians began to pray, and as the prayer intensified, the tension began to diminish. Residents of the area attributed the obvious change to the prayers of God’s people.

The witch doctor’s second daughter is now also a believer and his wife is attending church weekly. She has not committed her life to Christ, but has asked for prayer and stated that at some point she will become a follower of Jesus. Since this crisis and the subsequent prayer, there has been an increased openness to the Gospel.

Tags: witch doctor, prayer, transformation

All in a Day's Work...changed lives in Bellavista Prison

February 12 2015

As the prayer letter coordinator at the One Mission Society World Headquarters, I have the privilege of reading stories from the various fields where our missionaries serve. Of all the stories though, my favorite are the stories of redemption and transformed lives.

Allow me to share a story from Jeannine Brabon, OMS missionary in Colombia, who shares not only her faith but God’s character and his longing to be in relationship with people. In her most recent prayer letter, Jeannine tells about a visit to Bellavista, a maximum-security prison in Medellín. Here is an excerpt from Jeannine’s letter:

About 100 men were being processed into Bellavista. One group of men called to me and asked me to pray for them. I first invited them to accept Jesus and then prayed over them. Tears flowed down their cheeks as they thanked me. I believe I prayed with about 60 men before we entered our chapel. I alerted the brothers in prison, as they are faithful in following up!

There are incarcerated men in Bellavista who are brothers in the faith, redeemed to God, living out their faith behind bars. In the book The Lord of Bellavista by David Miller, an inmate shares his testimony, and part of his testimony is Jeannine’s visits with him, sharing the Word, as well as her heart. She wants people to know Jesus as she knows him, as Savior and Redeemer. Discipleship is key to transforming a convert into a follower of Jesus. It is one thing to believe the truth, it is another to live it – especially in prison. For the glory of God, the light of salvation shines in Bellavista.

God’s redeeming love (the way to salvation) is the overarching theme of the Bible. My heart soars as I read about people who have responded to God’s gift of salvation. The reason I have chosen a career as a missionary is that I want to be a part of God’s plan of reconciling people onto himself. As believers, we are ministers of reconciliation. For Jeannine, the team of evangelists, and the Christian inmates she works with in Bellavista, it is all in a day’s work. I am inspired to be more like Jeannine. Are you?

Do you want to know more about Jeannine and her ministry in Colombia? Click here. You can give to her ministry from this link too.

If you would like to contribute to the Prison Ministry in Colombia, click here to go to our Express Give page and enter account number #300530 in the space provided.

Read the book: The Lord of Bellavista by David Miller. To purchase click here.

For an inspiring video about Bellavista Prison, click the link here.

We also have a DVD documentary about changed lives in Bellavista called The Untold Stories of Colombia. For your copy, email info@onemissionsociety.org to request. The cost is $10.

By Beth Jordal, OMS Communications

Tags: prison ministry, bellavista, changed lives, transformation,

​Clinging to the Hope of Heaven

June 19 2014

When our One Mission Society missionaries decide to work in countries around the world, they are not signing up for vacations. Their stories from the mission field are often filled with a mixture of both successes and sadnesses. Oftentimes, the success stories are what keep us going in the midst of the sadness. In Mexico City, where OMS missionaries Steve and Helen Cosslett work with homeless youth, we praise God for each and every victory, but we also remember the tragedies that our missionaries see nearly every day.

Our ministry to street kids in Mexico City is called MEFI. The name is not only an acronym, but a process, which stands for Misericordia (Mercy), Esperanza (Hope), Fe (Faith), and Integración (Integration).

The MEFI website outlines how our missionaries and national coworkers minister to these children with the MEFI process.

“Mercy, underlines our initial contact and the practical help we seek to give the street children/young people, e.g. food, first-aid and shelter. Then we seek to bring the hope of Jesus Christ to these lives, showing them all that it means to be in a relationship with Him, including a hope for the future. If they then decide to embark on a journey with God, their faith will grow as they learn to trust Him and others. Lastly, we desire integration back into society for these street children, so that, in turn they can impact their families (if possible) and other street children by the changes they see in them.”

Unfortunately, when homelessness, jail time, drug addiction, prostitution, and other disheartening circumstances are thrown into the mix, this process turns into more of a roller coaster for the children and youth who meet our missionaries.

Meet Jenni. Jenni has been part of MEFI for about four years. After a life of drugs, she decided in January of this year that she wanted to check in to rehab. Our missionaries took her to the rehab center outside of the city and shared their testimonies. One of the workers who often visited her at the rehab center shared his story of how he conquered his drug addiction with God’s help. After about a month of being in rehab, Jenni went missing. After weeks of searching for her, MEFI recently received a phone call from the morgue saying they had a body that matched Jenni’s description. Their fears from the past weeks were confirmed when workers identified the body as Jenni’s. They were told that she died from cardiac arrest … probably because of her habitual drug abuse over several years.

Since arriving at the drop-in center, Jenni had grown very close to a lot of the workers and had several friends through MEFI. Although her death has given them a reason to mourn, her time at MEFI also has given them a reason to celebrate. With the help of our missionaries, and by the grace of God, Jenni was baptized four years ago. Our missionaries worked closely with Jenni and saw the change that Jesus was making in her life. When the sadness creeps in, they are reminded that Jenni is now pain free in the presence of God.

Praise God with us that, even though we lost Jenni, she was saved. Please pray for MEFI and our missionaries in Mexico City. Pray that this ministry would continue to be “a doorway from the darkness of the street to the dawn of abundant life!”

If you would like more information about MEFI, visit: www.mefi.co

By Christina Franks, OMS Summer Communications Intern

Tags: street kid ministry, street kids, drugs, rehab, transformation, mefi, one mission society