Lost in Africa

May 13 2019

One weekend, about five years ago, the Almeida family (OMS missionaries from Brazil, serving in Mozambique) went to a beach to relax. On the way home, they drove back to get on the ferry … only to discover it had broken down. How were they to get across the river and back home? Someone told them about a bridge that had been built about two hours to the north.

With unclear directions and no signs, they got lost in the bush, but what they discovered were many villages and lots of people living in that area with no Christian witness. Although they eventually found the bridge and got home, they couldn’t forget the people and began to pray for them.

God impressed these people on their hearts and even though it takes four hours to get there, Paulo and Fernanda started using the bridge to explore the area. Three years ago, Paulo asked our team to pray for a meeting he’d set up. It was with a local pastor he had met and various pastors from a cult/cultic church that mixes Old Testament rituals and Mozambican culture, such as doing animal sacrifices for special events.

Today, there is a strong Bible study going with 60 leaders in a place close to the main road. One man walks two and a half hours to get to the Bible study and has never been late. The bishop of a cultic church in that area has also been attending. Recently, he asked why Jesus needed to die. When he heard the reason, he was so sad because he found out when he was old. Fernanda told him, “Praise God you found out before it was too late!”

By Debbie Wittig, OMS Missionary in Mozambique

Tags: mozambique, church planting, getting lost in africa,

Meet Mutu ...

March 26 2019


Mutu Kumar, at the tender age of 10 years old, became suicidal because of his poor grades in school.

In the Indian culture, education is crucial and without it, he felt like a failure, like he was letting down his entire family.

Mutu Kumar was ripe for some good news.


He needed hope.


A Christian friend invited him to a Sunday school class.

Soon after, he heard the voice of Jesus telling him, “Give your life to me and I will give you a new life.”

That is exactly what happened. However, he kept his new faith and connection to the church a secret for one year.

After all, he was born into a Hindu family and his father was a priest!


Eventually, his father found out. He beat Mutu Kumar and locked him up in a room on Sundays.

Nevertheless, Mutu found a way out and returned to his new-found, nurturing Christian fellowship.


Later on, as he pursued his business IT studies, he made plans to go abroad and earn a good salary.

His pastor was struggling to provide for his family, and Mutu intended to help support him.

Instead, God spoke to his heart saying, “I want you, not your money!”


After several months of seeking a job, and facing many problems, he surrendered his life to serve the Lord in ministry.


Mutu Kumar launched out, doing ministry in the villages. Over time, he saw 40 Hindus give their hearts to Jesus.


God did many miracles ...


A 10-year-old girl who could not walk because of polio began to do so after prayers were offered.

A leader in the village who was a slave to alcohol was set free. The man and his whole family came to faith in Christ.

Over a period of several years, Mutu established two churches, handing one off to new leadership.


In 2016, he attended the ECI Jubilee training event and began learning OMS' Train & Multiply strategy.

He has since established 12 new house churches with the help of 3 farmers he is training.


His vision now is to train 5 leaders and establish 25 worshiping groups in 5 years.


Long range, Mutu Kumar is asking God for 125 new churches within 10 years.

It is a lofty goal that will require God’s powerful working!


Mutu's story is just one of the many stories of one person impacting many people after being equipped through the ministries of One Mission Society (OMS).

When you give to the OMS Global Impact Fund you are helping train and equip individuals like Mutu to reach their communities and beyond with the transforming Gospel of Jesus Christ.


Will you consider giving to the Global Impact Fund today?


Tags: evangelism, global impact fund, church planting,

Demonstrated Love in India

December 12 2018

Seventy men, women, and children sat down on the large plastic tarp spread out on the dirt at the entrance of the village. With a dubious history as roving Gypsy thieves, this unique community of the Banjara tribal people is now settling into a more traditional agricultural life. What a privilege for me to stand before them sharing God’s Word.

The stories of Jesus I chose seemed to capture their focus and move their hearts. Indian people delight in drama, so my translator and I acted out some of the events described. Their response showed clearly that God was at work! The next thing I knew I was given a bag of candy to pass out to the children.

It was obvious to me that the village people lacked basic, essential health care. Open sores, infections, and disabling injuries were quite evident. Our team spontaneously promised to sponsor a free medical clinic in the coming year. God’s love is best understood when it is demonstrated, not only explained. Expressions of kindness and compassion were the norm in Jesus’ own ministry. He healed the sick and took notice of those suffering without help and hope. May the Lord teach us all how to be sensitive, ready and willing to meet the needs of people around us. It is the greatest joy in life!

By Roger Kruse, Church Multiplication Facilitator in India

Tags: india, church planting, teaching god's word, banjara people, compassion ministry,

​The Juan Project

July 3 2018

The Philippines – a Christian nation. Not really. In its research, the Philippine Council of Evangelical Churches (PCEC) revealed that 90,500,000 Filipinos have never experienced a personal relationship with Jesus Christ. That represents 90.5% of the population.

Our Every Community for Christ (ECC) leadership team there knew that without some change, we would never make a significant dent in this statistic. We went to prayer. After four days, the Juan Project emerged.

The name for the Juan Project comes from the name Juan Dela Cruz (Juan for short), which has come to represent every Filipino individually and all Filipinos together. The aim of the Juan Project is to reach every “Juan” in five different provinces (Aurora, Leyte, Pangasinan, Samar, and Tarlac), and two people groups (students in the five provinces and Overseas Filipino Workers in 10 countries). We desire to plant a healthy, reproducing church in every sitio or purok (the smallest governing unit in the Philippines) in the five provinces. And, we will plant a healthy student ministry at each of the public college and university campuses in the five provinces.

We have completed the first year of the Juan Project. The first six months started slowly. In those months, we focused on building capacity, raising prayer support, building partnerships, offering training, and continuing to support the other ministries of OMS Philippines as they have contributed significantly to the saturation vision of The Juan Project. The fruit has come in the past six months.

In terms of capacity, we have grown from seven church multiplication facilitators (CMFs) to 25 CMFs and associate CMFs. Each works in a province to come alongside churches and organizations to cast vision, train, coach, encourage, provide prayer support, and instill accountability. We also have 54 trained facilitators who form the training teams to equip lay people to reach their families and communities for Christ. One hundred and fourteen new prayers groups have formed. Prayer walks and overnight prayer meetings are common. We work with at least 30 partners. And, in the last year, we have held 54 trainings, involving 895 people from over 100 churches.

The results: 216 groups started, 361 people equipped and mobilized, and 1,913 people who have entered into a relationship with Christ. A small but important turnaround.

Pastors now testify that their passion for church planting is rekindled, their perspective challenged, and their minds opened to church multiplication. PTL!

Tags: ​the juan project, evangelism, church planting, saturation, philippines

Seminary Graduate Plants Churches in Russia

August 16 2017

Ivan Beshlyaga graduated from MECS (Moscow Evangelical Christina Seminary) with a bachelor of divinity degree in 2005. He then moved to Nizhny Novgorod to plant a church. A year later, he baptized Natasha, his first convert. Natasha grew quickly in the Lord and was soon leading the worship at the new church plant. A year later, Ivan sent Sasha, the rector of MECS, a wedding invitation. He was marrying Natasha! Since then, Ivan and Natasha have had three kids and planted three churches in the area. This past year, both Ivan and Natasha graduated from the seminary: Ivan with a master of theology degree and Natasha with a bachelor of counselling degree. Ivan and Natasha have now returned to church planting in Nizhny Novgorod.

Thank God with us for the ministry of MECS, and how he is using it to prepare students to reach the people of Russia.

Tags: seminary, moscow seminary, mecs, russia, church planting,

Training Leaders in Haiti

August 8 2017

Since its beginning, One Mission Society has been in the business of developing Christ-like leaders for the global church. One of the ways this has been accomplished is through the planting of theological training institutions for the development of local church leaders all over the globe. Through the years, many of the Bible colleges and seminaries started by OMS have become leaders in their respective global regions among Protestant Evangelical theological schools. The Emmaus Biblical Seminary of Haiti is great example of one of those schools.

In 1967, OMS started the Emmaus Vocational Bible School (EVBS) in a small suburb of Cap-Haitian, Haiti. Through Radio 4VEH, an evangelism and discipleship ministry of OMS, churches were growing and the need for theologically trained pastors was growing with them!

The vision for EVBS was to develop both vocational and theological training for local pastors, church planters, and evangelists for the many small churches in northern Haiti. In 2000, after 33 years of equipping hundreds of local churches with theologically trained leaders, the school became Emmaus Biblical Seminary of Haiti. The vision for the rebranding of the school was to offer undergraduate and graduate-level theological training for an ever-growing Haitian church.

Today, Emmaus Biblical Seminary of Haiti is among the top 10 theological schools in the Caribbean and has one of the premier graduate programs among Caribbean theological schools. EBS has also partnered with Indiana Wesleyan University to deliver a masters in Theological Studies to Haitian students. The current enrollment at EBS is approximately 110 students with a mostly Haitian, fully credentialed faculty.

The following have been a direct result of the strategic partnership between EBS and OMS:

1. EBS has maintained its Wesleyan-holiness distinctive within its curriculum and training programs. Even today, EBS is one of only three theological schools in Haiti with a Wesleyan-holiness profile. Thanks to OMS, EBS believes that the best of the Gospel is the rest of the Gospel. This emphasis at EBS means the promotion of the transformation of moral character that is a necessary result of conversion (sanctification and discipleship development).

2. Because of EBS’s relationship with OMS, there is a continued emphasis on church planting throughout EBS training programs. In fact, approximately 40 percent of graduates go into some sort of church-planting ministry.

3. OMS has empowered the development of Christ-like leaders for the church in Haiti through providing highly credentialed faculty to teach intensive courses four times a year on the campus.

4. OMS has been a driving force in helping EBS raise funds for many development projects. In 2010, EBS relocated to a brand new, state-of-the-art campus five miles from its original location. Without OMS, this would not have been possible.

Without OMS, EBS would not exist today. Furthermore, EBS is one of dozens of schools with OMS’ fingerprints all over it. This is the business of the development of leaders for the global church. This is the business of Theological Education at OMS.

By Matt Ayars, rector and professor at EBS


To learn more about EBS and Haiti, watch this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3HaFJ8w50IE&feature=youtu.be

Tags: seminary, theological education, haiti, emmaus biblical seminary, church planting,

Reaching the Unreached in Loja, Ecuador

June 6 2017

In 2015, God opened the doors for a few OMS missionaries serving around Ecuador to come together with the goal of reaching the unreached population of Loja Province, a mountainous area in southern Ecuador with less than 1% evangelical Christians. This team is actively working to make a difference in the lives of people who may never hear about Jesus Christ from anyone else.

OMS:Who makes up the Loja team?

BJ: The Loja team is made up of BJ and Andrea Williamson,Tom and Susan Stiles, and Jennifer Riggs.

OMS: What is the ministry focus in Loja? What do you hope to accomplish?

BJ: Our focus is to raise up house churches in areas where there is no church.We do this by discipling new believers as the leaders of these house churches.We look for key people who are interested in the Gospel and disciple them in the Word, and encourage them to make a list of people who need to know the Gospel so they can pray for those people on the list. Each week, we share a different evangelistic passage that they will, in turn, share with one of those people they are praying for.

OMS: When and why did you relocate?

BJ: Two years ago,we prayed about where the Lord wanted us to start a ministry and found out that the western part of Loja Province is one of the least reached areas of Ecuador. We have since then relocated to Catamayo, our center for being able to travel to those unreached areas.

OMS: What different cities or villages are you focusing on? How many evangelicals are in this area? How many churches?

BJ: Our focus is on the Chaguarpamba and Balsas counties and the northern part of Paltas county. Combined, these areas have a population of roughly 20,000, but they have only one small church. Even with the church,there wouldn't be 50 believers. This is truly an area untouched by other ministries.

OMS: What are the biggest challenges you face? Your greatest joys?

BJ: It is challenging to travel as much as we do and to adjust the traditional beliefs held by 99% of the people we are in contact with. The religion we often see finds its roots in Roman Catholicism, but it has been mixed with other religions over the years, making it an interesting combination of beliefs,practices, and superstitions. Most people fear the change that Christianity calls them to make because the religion they are familiar with focuses on salvation through practices or tradition. But, our greatest joy is seeing people reading God’s Word and getting excited about learning about Christ and putting their faith in him.


Editor’s note: We will be sharing several stories of changed lives in Loja in the next 4 weeks, so keep watching for updated blogs.

Also, to learn more about Loja and what the team is doing there, here’s a video that will help make you see it through the team’s eyes:


Loja team interviewed by OMS summer Communications intern, Mykaela Alvey.

Tags: ecuador, ministry in loja province, evangelism, church planting, house churches, unreached,

​Reaping Dividends in Ministry

March 21 2017

Taran* serves as a church planter in Southern Asia. His ministry includes evangelism, doing baptisms, planting churches, and leading discipleship training. By God’s grace, Taran has planted five churches and made four disciples (new leaders). Taran is learning to be an effective trainer using the Train & Multiply curriculum.

The distances between ministry locations where Taran serves in Southern Asia are far apart, so he must either walk long distances or use public transport, which takes a lot of time, money, and energy. Most days, he is unable to visit every location that he needs to in order to lead in those towns.

“If Lord helps me to get a motorcycle for ministry, (this is one he rented) I will be highly encouraged and able to be much more effective in my work activities. I sometimes use rented motorbike, but paying hourly is way too expensive for me.”

If you would like to donate toward the purchase of a motorcycle for Taran, please click here.

* Name changed for security.

Tags: southern asia, church planting, train & multiply, motorcycle, bikes for church workers.,

Gift of a Motorcycle = Good ROI

March 14 2017

LB, age 26, lives and serves in South Asia. Since 2010, or since LB was just a teenager, he has worked as an evangelist and church planter among unreached people. LB has planted three churches and supervises six churches.

LB shares, “In the past, my life was a living hell before I had accepted the Lord Jesus Christ as my Savior. I used to steal things from the neighbor’s, from the grocery shops, and anywhere I could steal things I wanted. The villagers knew I had this bad habit, so they used to abuse me or mock me. My parents were also ashamed, and we were never invited to any special occasions in my village. A Christian pastor used to visit our home and others in the village. My mother shared my bad habit of stealing with the pastor. The pastor spoke to me humbly and shared the life of Jesus Christ with me. I am grateful to the Lord as I decided to give my life over to Christ. At first, I was afraid people wouldn’t accept me as a good person as they knew my bad habits.

“But I give all praise to the Lord as he made my path easy, and now being his servant, I am the happiest man on the earth. My parents are happy with me now, and my life is full of peace. I want to continue to serve his kingdom, sharing his Good News among the unreached so that their lives are also saved.”

LB visits the churches he supervises, as well as explores new places and opportunities for ministry using his bicycle. He spends many hours each day on his bicycle in order to reach his desired destinations. LB’s supervisors say he is an active and dynamic church planter, but could do so much more if he had a motorcycle for the ministry and reaching his goals of planting churches, baptizing believers, and forming many new disciples.

Would you be willing to give all or a portion of the cost of a motorcycle for LB? This is a gift that your ROI or return on investment for the kingdom would be multiplied over and over again.

Give here.

Tags: bikes for church workers, south asia, motorcycle, church planting, evangelism,

Making Disciples Near and Far

March 7 2017

In Haiti

In the mountainous area of Boukan Michel of Borgne in northern Haiti, trainers Job and Janiel traveled three hours until the road deteriorated to a simple path with a very steep valley on one side and a mountain on the other. Leaving their motorcycles, they walked three more hours in the rain and mud and spent the night at church planter Maxim’s home. Two couples studying the Train & Multiply booklet “Baptism” with Maxim wanted to be married so they could be baptized. One couple had been living together for 25 years, and the other for 20 years. Marriages are a strong witness to the community and bring maturity to the church.

Once a month, two of the eight church planters being trained leave their homes at 3:00 a.m. to arrive at the 9:00 a.m. training. They, in turn, train the other six church planters, resulting in three generations of worshiping groups.

In South Asia

Lashar is a dynamic church planter in South Asia. He supervises 10 churches, with more than 250 church members. He has 20 disciples under his supervision. Every month, he visits these churches, leading training and participating in baptisms, using his bicycle. Lashar often brings his wife to visit the churches so that she can minister directly with the women.

Lashar is one of our church planters that could exponentially increase his ministry if he had a motorcycle. Churches must be nurtured with frequent accountability visits. To strengthen the existing churches, to plant and multiply new churches, to baptize more believers, and to train multiplying disciples, Lashar needs a motorcycle that will save him time as he travels long distances. This year, he plans to plant six new churches and reach many hundreds of unreached people with the Good News of Jesus.

If you would like to donate to purchase a motorcycle or bicycle for a church worker around the world ... and KNOW that your investment is making an eternal difference, click here.

Tags: evangelism, motorcycles, church planting, asia, haiti, church workers,