​From Darkness to Light

April 18 2017

My name is Verrose Nunez, and I’m from the Philippines. I moved to South Korea in 2001 to work as an entertainer. I worked as a singer in a bar in Seoul, along with six other women. We worked from 7 pm to 3 am daily. Eventually, I quit my job and worked as a factory worker in Incheon to have a better salary and work environment.

In June 2009, friends invited me to attend a Friends of All Nations (FAN) meeting. My friends wanted to show me how God was faithful in their lives. The first time I visited, I felt the power of God and the love of the Christians that I met. After a few months, I accepted Christ as my Lord and Savior, and I was baptized on October 19, 2009.

My life was transformed from darkness to light. Since then, I have felt something different in my life. I learned the things that God doesn’t want me to do and also the things that he wants me to do, especially during rough times in my life.

I became a worship leader at FAN, and I was so happy that I was using my gift of singing to worship him and not to sing for men at the bar. God also led me to FAN to meet my husband José, who was a leader in the Filipino community. We got married at FAN in September 2010.

Just as the Bible says in Joshua 24:15, I promised God that my family and I would serve the Lord.

Through FAN, I felt the love and support of our pastors and brothers and sisters in Christ. I was far away from my family, but I didn’t feel alone because they all considered me as part of their family.

In 2011, I returned to the Philippines. My family noticed a big difference in my life. They noted that I was calm, content, and full of joy … totally different from the person that I was when I left the country. I am so thankful to God that he took me out of the darkness and brought me to light, and he also gave me the strength to love others. We soon started a Bible study through which my younger sister and her family accepted Christ as their Lord and Savior.

Even though my husband still works overseas, we are in constant communication with each other, and we always make sure that we are encouraging each other to grow more in the Lord. My husband, daughters, and I talk as a family through Skype. José and I want to make sure that our daughters understand the Bible and know God. As a family, we pray, read the Bible, and memorize and recite verses. It is hard being far away from my husband, but God strengthens me daily. I lead the youth and serve as a worship leader at our church, where my two daughters love to sing and learn Bible stories.

Tags: immigrant ministry, diaspora, south korea, philippines, outreach,

​Former One Mission Society Board Chairman, Dr. Dennis Kinlaw, Passes to Glory

April 18 2017

Dr. Dennis F. Kinlaw, beloved senior statesman of OMS as longtime trustee and Board chair, passed away on the morning of April 10, 2017, at the age of 94. Dr. Kinlaw was one of the longest serving chairmen of the international OMS Board of Trustees in the mission's history. He also served as the former Francis Asbury Society founder and president, Asbury University president, and Asbury Theological Seminary OT professor.

Dr. Kinlaw was the most warm hearted, intellectually sharp, and passionate follower of Christ whom we ever had the privilege of knowing. The number of people that he influenced for Christ around the world would be unfathomable. He was a Christian educator, insightful philosopher, published author, popular retreat and conference speaker, camp meeting evangelist, Bible teacher, academic scholar, institutional administrator, missionary statesman, reliable friend, faithful father, and devoted husband.

Personally, Dr. Kinlaw was instrumental in counseling Celia and me during our time of discerning God's call on our lives, and then paving the way that we would be accepted on probation at Asbury College. During those college years, he and Mrs. Kinlaw demonstrated lavish love toward us to such a degree that our duplex neighbors thought we were somebody when in actuality we were nobody. And lastly, Dr. Kinlaw helped me while serving as an executive officer in administration at OMS, to understand that when dealing with disciplinary matters, non-compliance with doctrinal distinctives, was tantamount to breaking covenant with OMS as a religious order. All in all, Dr. Kinlaw was one of the most influential leaders in our Christian life, helping to inform our spiritual faith, frame our ministerial competency, and foster Christ-like leadership in every aspect of our cross-cultural careers. And what he did for us can be multiplied over and over in the lives of so many other OMS missionaries and Christian leaders around the world.

Case in point, years ago, when former Seoul Theological University President, Dr. John Chongnahm Cho, was studying in Wilmore, he became acquainted with Dr. Kinlaw. After returning to Korea, then OMS missionary, Mr. Richard Capin, noted that a significant monthly contribution was included in the regular wire transfers earmarked for the then Rev. Cho, Chongnahm. With this financial assistance, Rev. Cho was able to continue his educational preparation, eventually earning his doctorate and becoming the foremost Wesleyan scholar in Korea and throughout Asia, serving as one of the longest tenured presidents, and leading Seoul Theological University to becoming one of the premier theological educational training centers in Korea and the entire Far East.

With much honor and great thankfulness to God, organizationally, we celebrate the life of Dr. Kinlaw and the many ways he served God through OMS.

  • He began his relationship with OMS at Asbury in the '40s when he sat in chapel alongside the founding Kilbourne’s grandsons, Edward, Erny and Elmer.
  • He served with 5 out of the 10 presidents of OMS, including Eugene Erny, Wesley Duewel, Everett Hunt, Ed Erny, and J. B. Crouse.
  • He served on the Board 35 years, 30 years as chairman.
  • He has been a pillar of strength.
  • He has helped keep OMS true to its Wesleyan heritage.
  • He has helped steer the mission through troubled waters.
  • He has given of his love, prayers, finances, time, children, and grandchildren.
  • His counsel, vision, and passion for reaching the world have had a great impact on making OMS what it is today.
  • His preaching, teaching, and writing on holiness were the extension of his sanctified life.
  • He exemplified the essence of a holy life over the years not only through his administration and leadership, but also through the spiritual messages he has etched on the OMS family and constituency.

The OMS leadership team and our worldwide missionary family as well as our international brothers and sisters in Christ are grateful that Dr. Kinlaw was a part of OMS and that his life has been woven into its very core. Our deepest appreciation, gratitude, and respect is due this man who influenced OMS missionaries and international coworkers around the world for decades.

Excerpts from OMS President Bob Fetherlin tribute, synthesized by David E. Dick, VP at Large

Tags: dr dennis kinlaw tribute, asbury university, oms board chair,

Friends of All Nations

April 7 2017

My wife and I, along with our children, served as missionaries who traveled the world on a ship and shared the Gospel at various port cities. When I returned to Korea 15 years later, I saw that the world was coming to me, with thousands of foreign workers migrating to Korea to find jobs.

As a result, I became motivated to start the Friends of All Nations ministry. I met a pastor who spoke English and had studied in the United States. We thought it would be a good idea to start a ministry to foreigners. So, we started praying, researching, and visiting places where there were already foreign worker ministries. After a few months, this pastor decided he didn’t feel called to this ministry, but he thought I should continue. I spent much time in prayer and felt God working in my heart to begin this ministry. Many mentors encouraged me, so with their encouragement I began my ministry in Namdong, an industrial district in Incheon, where there were 9,000 foreign factory workers. On July 1, 2001, Friends of All Nations (FAN) began.

FAN provides free or reduced-cost medical care, Korean language learning, meals, counseling, employment help, haircuts, and friendship to foreign workers. A primary goal of FAN is to disciple and train (using Train & Multiply materials) new leaders to start worshiping groups in Korean factories and also in the foreign workers’ hometowns.

God has sent us workers from Bangladesh, Africa, Philippines, Russia, Thailand, India, and Pakistan. FAN now has 35 FAN branches throughout Korea.

By David Jun, OMS partner and director of Friends of All Nations

Tags: korea, ministry to immigrants, compassion ministry, diaspora,

Breaking the 10/40 Window

April 4 2017

In incredible 13 percent of the population living in the United State are immigrants born in another nation. That’s 41,347,945 (read MILLION) people in total! Within this group includes great ethnic, cultural, and religious diversity. Immigration can enrich a nation’s culture, and simultaneously, challenge it to the core. For the church of Jesus, it provides us with obstacles that when placed in the hands of Christ become God-given opportunities for the Great Commission to be accelerated in a supernatural way across the globe.

When people arrive in a new country to live for the first time, they are often disorientated. Initially, everything that is new is often seen as different but interesting. But soon after arrival, it often changes to being uncomfortable and difficult to manage. Often, new immigrants search for people of their culture or language and live in close proximity to familiar food stores, cultural centers, and place of worship, which remind them of home and make the transition to living in the new country easier. For many places in America, the cultural landscape has transformed within the last few decades. Pastors that were trained to reach a white American culture now find themselves in neighborhoods with a significant percentage of people who see the world differently. There is not only a need to share the Gospel, but also to contextualize it so that it can be understood and accepted. The wonderful news is that a significant portion of immigrants are more open to new ideas, including religious beliefs, than their counterparts who stay in their nation of origin. Moving from one country to another often requires that a person is open to change. Immigrants are often open to the Gospel, so if we can communicate its glorious truth in a way that their cultural filters can understand, many can be reached.

Here in the U.S., there are immigrant populations from some of the hardest places on earth to reach with the Gospel. People in these nations are traditionally closed to Christianity, and the governments in these nations actually prevent evangelism. As these people see the church living their faith in Jesus through loving them, and as they understand their need for Christ, they often give their lives to him. As they are discipled and grow, they become great missionaries to their own people group. Those that live around them can hear in their own language, with informed cultural sensitivity.

Additionally, as these new believers grow, God will call some back to their land of origin. They will not need a visa or language study.

Immigration, forced or voluntary, is nothing new. Jesus in many senses was an immigrant, and the church of Acts grew extensively through forced migration. Today, we hear of the 10/40 window and the barriers to the Gospel. The people living in this window (area where the least reached live) and from other places around the world have come to us. As they are loved and engaged with the Gospel, Jesus saves, restores, and commissions. Individuals, families, and communities will be changed, transforming family trees for generations. Some will then return to that area, and these new believers will be used to break the window.

By Jonathan Morton, One Mission Society missionary, director of Nueva Vida ministry


Editor note: This is the first in a series of blogs on OMS' immigrant or diaspora ministries. In the month of April 2017, we will post new stories weekly.

Tags: immigrants, immigration, sharing the gospel, 10/40 window, diaspora ministry,

​Reaping Dividends in Ministry

March 21 2017

Taran* serves as a church planter in Southern Asia. His ministry includes evangelism, doing baptisms, planting churches, and leading discipleship training. By God’s grace, Taran has planted five churches and made four disciples (new leaders). Taran is learning to be an effective trainer using the Train & Multiply curriculum.

The distances between ministry locations where Taran serves in Southern Asia are far apart, so he must either walk long distances or use public transport, which takes a lot of time, money, and energy. Most days, he is unable to visit every location that he needs to in order to lead in those towns.

“If Lord helps me to get a motorcycle for ministry, (this is one he rented) I will be highly encouraged and able to be much more effective in my work activities. I sometimes use rented motorbike, but paying hourly is way too expensive for me.”

If you would like to donate toward the purchase of a motorcycle for Taran, please click here.

* Name changed for security.

Tags: southern asia, church planting, train & multiply, motorcycle, bikes for church workers.,

Dynamic Women in Mission Trip to Israel 2017

March 20 2017

Tags: dw, dynamic women in mission, mission trip, isreal

Colombia Medical Mission Trip Details

March 15 2017

Tags: dynamic women in missions, mission trip, medical missions, colombia

Gift of a Motorcycle = Good ROI

March 14 2017

LB, age 26, lives and serves in South Asia. Since 2010, or since LB was just a teenager, he has worked as an evangelist and church planter among unreached people. LB has planted three churches and supervises six churches.

LB shares, “In the past, my life was a living hell before I had accepted the Lord Jesus Christ as my Savior. I used to steal things from the neighbor’s, from the grocery shops, and anywhere I could steal things I wanted. The villagers knew I had this bad habit, so they used to abuse me or mock me. My parents were also ashamed, and we were never invited to any special occasions in my village. A Christian pastor used to visit our home and others in the village. My mother shared my bad habit of stealing with the pastor. The pastor spoke to me humbly and shared the life of Jesus Christ with me. I am grateful to the Lord as I decided to give my life over to Christ. At first, I was afraid people wouldn’t accept me as a good person as they knew my bad habits.

“But I give all praise to the Lord as he made my path easy, and now being his servant, I am the happiest man on the earth. My parents are happy with me now, and my life is full of peace. I want to continue to serve his kingdom, sharing his Good News among the unreached so that their lives are also saved.”

LB visits the churches he supervises, as well as explores new places and opportunities for ministry using his bicycle. He spends many hours each day on his bicycle in order to reach his desired destinations. LB’s supervisors say he is an active and dynamic church planter, but could do so much more if he had a motorcycle for the ministry and reaching his goals of planting churches, baptizing believers, and forming many new disciples.

Would you be willing to give all or a portion of the cost of a motorcycle for LB? This is a gift that your ROI or return on investment for the kingdom would be multiplied over and over again.

Give here.

Tags: bikes for church workers, south asia, motorcycle, church planting, evangelism,

Making Disciples Near and Far

March 7 2017

In Haiti

In the mountainous area of Boukan Michel of Borgne in northern Haiti, trainers Job and Janiel traveled three hours until the road deteriorated to a simple path with a very steep valley on one side and a mountain on the other. Leaving their motorcycles, they walked three more hours in the rain and mud and spent the night at church planter Maxim’s home. Two couples studying the Train & Multiply booklet “Baptism” with Maxim wanted to be married so they could be baptized. One couple had been living together for 25 years, and the other for 20 years. Marriages are a strong witness to the community and bring maturity to the church.

Once a month, two of the eight church planters being trained leave their homes at 3:00 a.m. to arrive at the 9:00 a.m. training. They, in turn, train the other six church planters, resulting in three generations of worshiping groups.

In South Asia

Lashar is a dynamic church planter in South Asia. He supervises 10 churches, with more than 250 church members. He has 20 disciples under his supervision. Every month, he visits these churches, leading training and participating in baptisms, using his bicycle. Lashar often brings his wife to visit the churches so that she can minister directly with the women.

Lashar is one of our church planters that could exponentially increase his ministry if he had a motorcycle. Churches must be nurtured with frequent accountability visits. To strengthen the existing churches, to plant and multiply new churches, to baptize more believers, and to train multiplying disciples, Lashar needs a motorcycle that will save him time as he travels long distances. This year, he plans to plant six new churches and reach many hundreds of unreached people with the Good News of Jesus.

If you would like to donate to purchase a motorcycle or bicycle for a church worker around the world ... and KNOW that your investment is making an eternal difference, click here.

Tags: evangelism, motorcycles, church planting, asia, haiti, church workers,

​Investing for a Greater Cause

March 2 2017

Young serves as a church planter in Asia. He’s involved in evangelism, baptisms, church planting, and discipleship training. Young shares, “By God’s almighty grace, I have planted eight churches and trained eight leaders. These 8 disciples are further planting 12 new cell groups. Praise the Lord!”

Young uses the Train & Multiply curriculum, which has helped transform people in his village. The distance from village to village in my country are far apart. Usually, I either have to walk or use public transportation, which takes a lot of time and energy. In a day, I am unable to reach all of the places I need to, so evangelism, which takes much time, cannot be completed in each location.

“If Lord helps me to get a motorcycle, then I will be highly encouraged, and my work activities will increase in areas of evangelism, doing baptisms, church planting, and discipleship training. Sometimes, I rent a motorbike, paying for it by the hour, but this is much too expensive for me to bear often,” said Young.

If you would like to invest in a greater cause, would you consider donating today for OMS to purchase Young a motorbike? To give, click here.

Tags: every community for christ, asia, motorbikes, evangelism, church planting, t &m